'The Lords Supper' Tagged Posts

'The Lords Supper' Tagged Posts

The Lord’s Supper is a Meal, Part V

We have come to the fifth article in the series entitled, “The Lord’s Supper is a Meal.” Below are the links to all the articles written so far. I am also going to add Part VI in order to answer questions that have come to me during the writing of these articles or that seem appropriate for me to set forward in order to clarify.  Part I The Lord’s Supper is a Weekly Meal Part II  The Lord’s Supper is a…

The Lord’s Supper is a Meal, Part IV

Because I’m writing these articles first online (perhaps later as a small book), I will take the liberty to edit as I’m going. This happens as I realize the need for improvements in the writing or content, sometimes reflecting comments and questions being sent to me. Speaking of the questions that arise, I will also be able to answer some of them in the practical section about implementation, Part V, and in Part VI, a section I will add just…

The Lord’s Supper is a Meal, Part III

In Part I, we saw that the Lord’s Supper is a weekly meal. In Part II, we saw that the Lord’s Supper is an experience of intentional fellowship. We live out that fellowship in a focused way in the meal itself. In most churches this meal is nonexistent. Rather, the Lord’s Supper has become for many the most independent and even private (or vertical only) aspect of worship in their gatherings, essentially emptied of the fellowship with one another which…

The Lord’s Supper is a Meal, Part II

In Part I we saw that the Lord’s Supper is an actual meal. At the center of that meal is the bread and wine (or the less fermented juice), about which we will talk later. We also saw that this was a weekly meal. It was, no doubt, the way early believers thought of church life together. They would have said, “We come together to eat.”  But Paul also expressed a concern related to that meal that had already caused…

The Lord’s Supper is a Meal, Part I

The purpose for these five articles: I want to stimulate the churches to eat the Lord’s Supper as an actual meal for the purpose of augmenting authentic fellowship in Christ, while highlighting the special cup and bread which symbolize the only reason for our union, worship, and mutual edification. Alexio had become a believer in Christ when the Apostle Paul visited Corinth in Achaia, today’s southern Greece. Corinth was the largest city there, out-sizing Athens. He was a wealthy man,…